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Mechanical Engineering with a Foundation Year - BEng (Hons)

  • UCAS Code: H308
  • Level: Foundation
  • Starting: September 2021
  • Study mode: Full Time (4 years), Sandwich (5 years)
  • Location: City Centre

Studying with us in 2021/22

It is possible that the 2021/22 academic year may be affected by the ongoing disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Any arrangements put in place by the University for the 2021/22 academic year will be in accordance with the latest government public health advice, pandemic-related/health and safety legislation, and the terms and conditions of the student contract.

Our Mechanical Engineering BEng (Hons) degree with a foundation year, will develop you as a skilled engineer capable of undertaking mechanical engineering tasks within and across organisations. It will also equip you with a range of advanced analytical and design skills. You'll work on industry-standard analytical tools as well as explore other facilities such as our test cell and exhaust analysis equipment.

The Foundation Year course option enables you to study for our BEng (Hons) degree over an extended full-time duration of four years by including a Foundation Certificate (year one of four) in your studies. The Foundation Certificate provides a broad study programme that underpins the follow-on degree. In order to progress to the next year of the degree, it is necessary to achieve a pass in all modules of the Foundation Certificate.

What's covered in the course?

Our Mechanical Engineering course focuses on the importance of sustainable futures and the Government's STEM agenda, in order to give you the knowledge and attributes you will need to thrive in this ever-changing industry.

You’ll focus on project-based activities, giving you lots of opportunity to work in teams on projects from design to implementation. This will give you practical experience of applying engineering science to real world problems, working in multidisciplinary teams to develop your interpersonal skills, and prepare you for a key aspect of modern engineering practice. Problem solving and project management are key skills for an engineer, and our focus on application of skills will help to improve your skills in these highly sought after areas.

During your studies, you will use the latest tools and technologies, developing new skills at an advanced level. The course will encourage your creative thinking and develop your engineering leadership skills. Building on a foundation of the generic skills required by tomorrow’s engineers, you will also explore the wider context of engineering, as well as the application of advanced engineering principles to solve problems through research and development. You’ll engage in independent study and systematic enquiry at an advanced level and take responsibility for the conclusions drawn from it.

You will have lots of opportunity to apply industry-standard modelling and simulation techniques to the analysis, specification and design of mechanical engineering systems so that you are able to apply your knowledge and theory to a practical situation. In this way, we make sure you are ready to step straight into employment.

I decided to study at Birmingham City University because while I was in full time employment this course offered everything that I needed part time and covered all the modules that I needed to progress in my career role.

The course offered all the different practical elements as well as the theoretical elements for power generation and design – the subjects that I enjoyed and wanted to progress on to in my career. Katja Wotton Srbljanin

Why Choose Us?

  • Accredited course - This course is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).
  • Industrial placement year option - Gain desirable employability skills and work experience with the option of an industrial placement year, that will take place between your second and final year of the course.
  • Formula Student events at Silverstone - We are one of the select UK universities with access to take part in our international Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) Formula Student event at Silverstone. Read Marta’s story.
  • State-of-the-art facilities - You will be based at our Millennium Point campus in City Centre, where our facilities have undergone a £6.5 million investment with a new maker area, engineering labs/equipment and IT equipment to provide you with the very best learning experience. You will also use our industry-standard equipment and resources, including rapid prototyping, laser-cutting and CNC machining.
  • Employable graduates - Our graduates have progressed into roles with leading companies such as Jaguar Land Rover, Morgan Motors, GKN, Bentley, Mercedes, Rolls-Royce and JCB.
  • Events and Expos - We host events including Global Game Jam, TechFest, and InnovationFest enabling you to build and design your own creations, as well as gain vital organisational experience.
  • Travel scholarships - Opportunities to secure funding to gain experience overseas. Read about travel scholarships here.

This course is open to International students

We are members of:

WISE member logo2 WISE members inspire girls to choose maths, physics and computing.

Entry Requirements

We accept a range of qualifications, the most popular of which are detailed below.

Essential Requirements

BB or 80 UCAS tariff points

A maximum of 3 subjects are considered. These can be other A-levels or level 3 equivalents.

LEVEL 2 QUALIFICATIONS
GCSE
  • GCSE English language and mathematics at grade C/4 or above/li>
  • Equivalent level 2 qualifications can be accepted.
  • Must have been achieved at the point of enrolment
Irish Leaving Certificate (Ordinary Level)
  • See level 3 entry under Irish Leaving Certificate for full details
Scottish Intermediate 2
  • English language and mathematics at grade C or above
  • Must have been achieved at the point of enrolment
Scottish Credit Standard Grade
  • English language and mathematics at grade 2 or above
  • Must have been achieved at the point of enrolment
Scottish National 5
  • English language and mathematics at grade C or above
  • Must have been achieved at the point of enrolment
LEVEL 3 (and above) QUALIFICATIONS
A level and Advanced VCE
  • 80 UCAS points
  • A maximum of 3 subjects are considered. These can be other A-levels or level 3 equivalents.
Access to HE Diploma
  • 60 credits overall. Minimum of 45 credits at level 3. Including 12 technical credits at Merit or Distinction..
  • Pearson BTEC National Extended Diploma
    (2016 – present)
  • Pearson BTEC Extended Diploma (QCF)
    (2010 - 2016)
  • BTEC Level 3 National Diploma
    (2002 – 2010)
  • MMP
  • Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma
    (2016 – present)
  • Pearson BTEC Diploma (QCF)
    (2010 – 2016)
  • BTEC Level 3 National Certificate
    (2002 – 2010)
  • 80 UCAS points
  • Considered with one A-level or an equivalent level 3 qualification
  • Pearson BTEC National Foundation Diploma (2016 to present)

  • Pearson BTEC 90-Credit Diploma (QCF) (2010 - 2016)

  • 80 UCAS points
  • Considered with one A-level or an equivalent level 3 qualification
  • Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate
    (2016 – present)

  • Pearson BTEC Subsidiary Diploma (QCF)
    (2010 - 2016)

  • BTEC Level 3 National Award
    (2002 - 2010)

  • 80 UCAS points
  • Considered with one A-level or an equivalent level 3 qualification

Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate - Skills Challenge Certificate (first teaching September 2015)

  • 80 UCAS points

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma – Core (awarded until 2016) ESW/KS Combined component

  • 80 UCAS points

International Baccalaureate Diploma

  • Obtain a minimum of 28 points overall and pass one of the following subjects from Group 4 at Higher Level (Computer Science, Chemistry, Design Technology, Physics)

  • For students who do not already hold a GCSE in Mathematics at Grade C/4 or above grade 5 in Maths (Standard Level) from the IB Diploma will be accepted

  • For students who do not already hold a GCSE in English Language at Grade C/4 or above Standard Level English Language (not literature) English A - Grade 4 or above or English B - Grade 5 from the IB will be accepted.

Other qualifications
If you have a qualification that is not listed in the table please refer to our full entry requirements on UCAS.

Further guidance on tariff points can be found on the UCAS website.
Additional information for EU/International students
Essential

Please see your country page for further details on the equivalent qualifications we accept.

In additional to the academic entry requirements listed above, international and EU students will also require the qualifications detailed in this table.

EU/Non-EU (International) Qualifications  
IELTS

6.0 overall with 5.5 minimum in all bands

If you do not meet the required IELTS score, you may be eligible for one of our pre-sessional English courses. Please note that you must have a Secure English Language Test (SELT) to study on the pre-sessional English course. More information.

International Baccalaureate Diploma (or equivalent, including internationally accredited Foundation courses).

1. For students who complete the full IB Diploma: a total of 14 points or above from three Higher Level Subjects.

2. Students who do not complete the IB Diploma will be considered on the basis of their IB Certificates.

Students must have grade 5 in Maths (Standard Level)
AND
English Group A - Grade 4 or above,
OR
English Group B and Ab Initio - Grade 5

Country-specific entry requirements and qualifications.

 

International students who cannot meet the direct entry requirements can begin their degree studies at Birmingham City University International College (BCUIC).

Additional Requirements

As part of the application process you will be invited to attend an applicant visit day where you will undertake a short one-to-one interview with an academic member of staff. This is your chance to show us how passionate you are about the subject and it will help us make a decision on your application.

This will provide you with more information about the School and your course. In addition, it will give you a chance to meet and our staff and students to gain a better understanding of what it is like to be a student here.

International Students

Entry requirements here

  • UK students
  • International students

Award: BEng (Hons)

Starting: Sep 2021

  • Mode
  • Duration
  • Fees
  • Study Year £9,250
  • Placement Year £1,650

Sandwich Fees

Our Sandwich courses incur a fee during the placement year, the costs for years when you attend the university for study, and the cost for the placement year are shown here.

Award: BEng (Hons)

Starting: Sep 2021

  • Mode
  • Duration
  • Fees

The University reserves the right to increase fees in line with inflation based on the Retail Prices Index or to reflect changes in Government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament up to a maximum of five per cent.

Guidance for UK students

UCAS

UK students applying for most undergraduate degree courses in the UK will need to apply through UCAS.

The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) is a UK organisation responsible for managing applications to university and college.

Applying through UCAS
 Register with UCAS
 Login to UCAS
 Complete your details
 Select your course
 Write a personal statement
 Get a reference
 Pay your application fee
 Send UCAS your application

Additional costs

There are no compulsory additional costs or charges associated with studying on this course. While you may choose to purchase personal copies of text books, all our key text books are available from our library or online (subject to normal library loan and online access arrangements). If your course includes a residential study session, the accommodation costs for this are already included in your course fee.

Based on the past experience of our students, you might find it helpful to set aside about £50 for each year of your studies for stationery and study materials. All our students are provided with 100 free pages of printing each year to a maximum total value of £15.

Accommodation and living costs

The cost of accommodation and other living costs are not included within your course fees. More information on the cost of accommodation can be found in our accommodation pages.

Foundation Year

20 credits

Mathematics plays a key role in establishing and grounding the professional skills of an engineer. Communicating the ideas of engineering is made both easier and harder by the use of mathematical language.

This module aims to help you become proficient at developing engineering models and arguments, and following them through to their logical conclusions, since application of these arguments has to include their interpretation both to and from the mathematical language.

20 credits

The module aims to provide you with the knowledge and problem solving skills in physical science to enable you to progress to the next module in the science theme, Foundation Science II, and then on to the first year of an engineering degree.

As the practical aspects of physical science are delivered in another theme of the foundation year, the Foundation Science modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects. The subject material will be delivered in two coherent streams, one of which contains predominantly mechanical science and the other predominantly electrical science.

20 credits

This module aims to provide you with the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress to the next module in the practical theme, Practical Skills II, and then on to the first year of an engineering degree.

The theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in another theme of the foundation year. The Practical Skills modules sit alongside these and concentrate on the practical aspects to support your learning.

20 credits

Mathematics plays a key role in establishing and grounding the professional skills of an engineer. Communicating the ideas of engineering is made both easier and harder by the use of mathematical language.

This module aims to help you become proficient at further developing engineering models and arguments, and following them through to their logical conclusions, since application of these arguments has to include their interpretation both to and from the mathematical language.

20 credits

This module aims to provide the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress to the first year of an engineering degree.

As the theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in another theme of the foundation year, the Practical Skills modules concentrate on the practical aspects.

The subject material will be delivered in three coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical and electrical laboratory exercises, a second PC-based stream will include use of software to support project planning, communication and analysis and the third, a project space where you will have the opportunity to integrate learning from across all elements of the semester. 

20 credits

The module aims to provide you with the knowledge and problem solving skills in physical science to enable you to progress to the first year of an engineering degree. The science theme contains the material normally encountered in an A level physics course which is relevant to entry to an engineering degree. As the practical aspects of physical science are delivered in another theme of the foundation year, the Foundation Science modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects.

Year One

20 credits

The module aims to provide the underpinning knowledge and problem solving skills in engineering science to enable you to progress to the next module in the theme, Engineering Principles II, and then on to the second year of a range of engineering degrees.

As the practical aspects of engineering science are delivered in another theme of the common first year, the Engineering Principles modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects. The subject material will be delivered in two coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical science and the other contains predominantly electrical science.

20 credits

The module aims to provide the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress to the next module in the practical theme, Practical Skills II, and then on to the second year of an engineering degree. As the theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in other themes of the first year, the Practical Skills modules concentrate on the practical aspects.

The subject material will be delivered in three coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical and electrical laboratory exercises, a second PC-based stream will include use of software to support project planning, communication and analysis and the third, a project space where you have the opportunity to integrate learning from across all elements of the semester.

20 credits

Mathematics plays a key role in establishing and grounding the skills of an engineer, and the ability to communicate the ideas of engineering that are expected of an engineering graduates.

The primary aim of this module is to provide the fundamental mathematical knowledge and techniques needed in order to enable you to use and apply such mathematical techniques for the evaluation, analysis, modelling and solution of realistic engineering problems. Application of these data sets has to include their interpretation both to and from the mathematical language. In addition, this module will introduce students to mathematical modelling software package. This will be used to plot, annotate basic signals and write simple programs to compute mathematical problems.

This module will develop your ability to both work on and communicate engineering realities to a wider audience, at a professional standard.

20 credits

The module aims to provide the underpinning knowledge and problem solving skills in engineering science to enable you to progress to the second year of a wide range of engineering degrees. As the practical aspects of engineering science are delivered in another theme of the common first year, the Engineering Principles modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects. The subject material will be delivered in two coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical science and the other contains predominantly electrical science.

20 credits

This module will focus on introducing and building on well-established techniques for mathematically modelling dynamic systems (systems of interest for engineering) for contextualised engineering applications. The module will include an introduction to sophisticated signal analysis technique, Fourier series which is used to transform time-domain signals into their frequency spectra. The module is structured to include a mixture of lectures, tutorials and PC-based laboratories. The lectures will formally introduce material, in tutorials students will work through questions with tutor. The PC laboratories will involve using mathematical modelling software packages to implement mathematical operations.

20 credits

The module aims to provide the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress on to the second year of an engineering degree. As the theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in other themes of the first year, the Practical Skills modules concentrate on the practical aspects.

The subject material will be delivered in three coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical and electrical laboratory exercises, a second PC-based stream will include use of software to support project planning, design, communication and analysis and the third, a project space where you have the opportunity to integrate learning from across all elements of the semester.

Year Two

20 credits

The module aims to provide a basic understanding of thermodynamic and fluid mechanic concepts. The understanding of the transfer of energy within thermodynamic systems and the incurred losses is vital to improve efficiencies of such systems, especially in light of growing environmental concerns and increased economic cost.

The knowledge and understanding will be gained through a balanced mixture of lectures and tutorials, whereby the learning will be supported by experiments.

20 credits

The module provides you with the opportunity to learn about design, sustainable development, teamwork and communication whilst contributing towards real international development projects.

You will also gain the ability to communicate design ideas and practical details, to evaluate and apply both tangible and subjective feedback, and to conceive, design, implement and operate practical solutions to design opportunities.

It is anticipated that the project vehicle for this module will be the Engineers without Borders Design for People Challenge.

20 credits

The module introduces the mathematical concepts such as transform calculus and matrix theory used to solve systems of first and second order differential equations underpinning the engineering disciplines undertaken within the Faculty.

This provides you with the capability of modelling systems using both the transfer function and statespace paradigms. In particular, you will be able to model linear systems in continuous and discrete time as well as by frequency response methods.

Teaching and assessment will comprise not only traditional lectures and tutorials but also provide training in industry standard software for problem solving within coursework assessment.

20 credits

An interdisciplinary module, you will work with students from all fields of engineering to develop skills in engineering leadership and experience creating a purposeful vision and delivering on that vision. This will set the professional skills for business in context by combining your technical course-specific knowledge with professional skills. It is proposed that the vehicle to deliver this will be the biomimicry global design challenge.

20 credits

The Mechanical Science module applies the principles of engineering, physics, and materials science to the design, analysis, manufacture, and maintenance of mechanical systems and components. It is a branch of engineering that enables you to design, produce, and operate machinery. In keeping with the programme philosophy the module encourages learning through the practical application of fundamental mechanical science principles to the analysis and solution real world problems.

20 credits

This module develops your research skills, idea generation techniques, and ability to create CAD models and manufactured components.

You will also gain the ability to communicate design ideas and practical details, to evaluate and apply both tangible and subjective feedback, and to conceive, design, implement and operate practical solutions to design opportunities.

Year Three

20 credits

In the development cycle of new and existing components, processes and systems the use of computer analysis has a strong role to play. Reduced lead times can mean faster arrival at the market than competitors and therefore gaining an advantage. Engineers are at the centre of the development process and therefore require a good understanding of the key aspects of computer aided engineering (CAE).

20 credits

The module introduces you to the mathematical tools underpinning the analysis, modelling and design of complex vibrating systems and mechanisms as well as the software tools within an appropriate simulation environment used for their solution. Industry standard software will also be used for the design of dynamical control systems using both time and frequency domain techniques.

Teaching and assessment will comprise not only traditional lectures/tutorials, but also use of industry standard software for the purposes of mathematical modelling, all of which are assessed by examination.

20 credits

Mechanical engineers nowadays solve problems of high and multidisciplinary complexity. Although computational solutions generally lead to reliable results, the engineer should always attempt to validate the findings by alternative methods. This requires a thorough understanding of the underlying problems, but also the approach of reasonable simplification of complex systems without compromising validity.

20 credits

The dependency of the current economy of fossil fuels as source of power requires a shift in thinking by engineers and companies to design and develop more efficient machines, processes and systems. The module therefore aims to provide you with the knowledge and understanding required to analyse thermodynamic systems concerned with conversion processes between heat and work. In addition the issues and limitations of the energy generation process play also a vital part and how energy can be recovered from processes to improve the overall efficiency.

The module follows the Mechanical Engineering programme philosophy of developing your intellectual and practical competence in the thermodynamic, power generation and energy conversion aspects of mechanical engineering. Formal lectures, tutorials, hands-on experience in labs and solving of problem based scenarios will enhance the learning process.

40 credits

The purpose of the module is to enable you to undertake a sustained, in-depth and research-informed project exploring an area that is of personal interest to you. In agreement with your supervisor, you will decide upon your topic which will take the form of a practical outcome (artefact) with accompanying contextual material. The main consideration when choosing your topic is that it must be aligned to the programme you are studying, and you should consider the relevance of this topic to your future academic or professional development.

At this level, you will be expected to work independently but you will receive additional one-to-one support from your supervisor, who will be familiar with your chosen topic area. As you progress on the module, extra support will be available and this may take the form of group seminars, workshops and online materials that will help to develop your project. 

You will be taught through lectures, tutorials and seminars, as well as lab-based work. You will gain a range of transferrable skills, such as communication, teamwork and more.

Knowledge and understanding is assessed formatively by work-based learning and problem solving, in-class tasks, seminar work, peer assessment and learning sets. Summative assessment is by way of assignments, projects, presentations, time-controlled assignments and end examinations, where appropriate to the individual module.

Intellectual skills, particularly analytical and problem solving skills, are developed using a range of case-studies and problem / task-based learning scenarios, promoting self-directed learning facilitated by problem-based learning centred upon industry practice and its inherent problems.

Assessment of such activities includes practical simulation and design exercises and individual and group projects, in addition to the methods mentioned above.

Attendance requirements

There are 30 attendance weeks in each academic year.

A typical week on this course will include 20 hours per week of contact time over four days, plus self study time.

International Opportunities

If you are interested in undertaking part of your studies abroad, the Erasmus scheme may be of interest to you. It allows higher education students to study for part of their degree in another European country.

It is open to undergraduates in their second year (or above) and offers a unique opportunity to enhance your CV and experience new cultures. If you study with us you will have access to an Erasmus co-ordinator, who can provide information about which institutions we have links with.

Further Study

You could enrol on our highly regarded MSc Mechanical Engineering programme once you have completed your BEng (Hons) degree. We also offer a range of research (PhD) postgraduate engineering programmes that are suitable for graduates of this course. Details can be found on the postgraduate section of the website.

Through group work and project-based challenges, you will develop transferable and marketable skills and knowledge applicable to a variety of employment opportunities within the mechanical engineering and associated industries.

We will develop the skills, understandings and personal attributes that will help you stand out from the crowd when it comes to securing employment.

We will ensure you are professional, work-ready and enterprising, with a global outlook and the ability to solve problems creatively.

Placements

We aim to have you employer-ready by the time you graduate and as part of this commitment we encourage you to further enhance your career prospects by including an industrial placement in your course.

You will do your placement after the second year of study, which will extend the duration of your course to four years if you are studying on a full-time basis, and you’ll be supported throughout your time away.

Thanks to our excellent partnerships and strong relationships with industry, you could join the ranks of our students who have gained exceptionally high quality work experience at companies including Triumph, BMW and Bosch.

Placements provide the workplace experience that many employers look for and give you an invaluable opportunity to develop your practical expertise, earn money and try out a potential career path.

OpportUNIty

OpportUNIty Student Ambassador

OpportUNIty: Student Jobs on Campus ensures that our students are given a first opportunity to fill many part-time temporary positions within the University. This allows you to work while you study with us, fitting the job around your course commitments. By taking part in the scheme, you will gain valuable experiences and employability skills, enhancing your prospects in the job market.

It will also allow you to become more involved in University life by delivering, leading and supporting many aspects of the learning experience, from administration to research and mentoring roles.

Graduate Success

Thanks to our methods of teaching and learning, as well as our industry links and academic staff that can draw on years of relevant industry practice, our graduates have gone on to work for some of the UK’s most prestigious employers including:

  • Jaguar Land Rover
  • Morgan Motors
  • GKN
  • Bentley
  • Mercedes
  • Rolls-Royce
  • JCB

Birmingham City University is a vibrant and multicultural university in the heart of a modern and diverse city. We welcome many international students every year – there are currently students from more than 80 countries among our student community.

The University is conveniently placed, with Birmingham International Airport nearby and first-rate transport connections to London and the rest of the UK.

Our international pages contain a wealth of information for international students who are considering applying to study here, including:

Birmingham City University International College (BCUIC)

International students who have a serious interest in studying with us but who perhaps cannot meet the direct entry requirements, academic or English, or who have been out of education for some time, can enter Birmingham City University International College (BCUIC) and begin their degree studies.

BCUIC

BCUIC is part of the global Navitas Group, an internationally recognised education provider, and the partnership allows students to access the University’s facilities and services and move seamlessly through to achieving a Bachelor’s degree from Birmingham City University.

Learn more about BCUIC

Our Facilities

We are constantly investing in our estate and are currently in the process of spending £340 million on new learning facilities.

Building work on our new Conservatoire began in the summer of 2015 – and is scheduled for completion in summer 2017. This, along with the construction of a new city centre accommodation block, means our students have access to their very own building sites.

We couple this with the more traditional, office-based facilities:

Surveying equipment

Part of your learning activity will be hands-on, including carrying out survey work using a range of equipment, such as levels, theodolites, measuring tapes.

Computer Assisted Design (CAD)

You will be provided with the latest CAD software – free of charge – to enable you to acquire the skills you need in a modern design office.

Learning from industry experts

Discover more about the industry experts you can meet on our Engineering degree courses.

Laura Leyland is one of our lecturers, watch this video to find out more.

Portrait of  Adnan Fazal

Dr Adnan Fazal

Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering

Dr Adnan Fazal is a Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering and Automotive Engineering. His current research interests include pre-stressed fibre reinforced polymers for improved strength, stiffness, impact protection, resistance to crack propagation and protection against abnormal loads. Potential applications of these smart fibre reinforced polymers include crashworthy structures (automotive), aerofoil morphing structures (aerospace), light-weight blast-resistant (impact protection), medical (dental restoration and prosthetic devices), wind turbine blades and safety and sports apparel.

Read Adnan's full profile

Laura Leyland

Associate Professor and Acting Head Centre of Engineering

Laura Leyland is an Associate Professor and Acting Head of Centre and has been innovating in engineering education for over 10 years, teaching materials based modules and practical project focussed delivery with a specific interest in developing humanitarian engineering. This module delivery incorporates the Engineering for People Challenge from Engineers Without Borders (BCU winners in 2015) and the Global Biomimicry Challenge.
During a university wide curriculum development project, Laura lead the rewrite of all engineering courses for initial delivery in 2018 to the Conceive, Design, Implement, Operate (CDIO) framework which develops professional skills alongside theoretical knowledge.

Dr Dominic Flynn

Dr Dominic Flynn

Lecturer

Dominic Flynn is a Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering and teaches across a range of modules from foundation to MSc level. His teaching interests are in the mechanical sciences as well as fluid and thermodynamics. 

Portrait of Reaz Hasan

Reaz Hasan

Associate Professor

Reaz Hasan’s expertise is primarily in the area of Energy Studies. He has extensive research experience in using CFD for fluid flow and heat transfer in Built Environment and various industrial systems including applications of nano-fluids. He is also involved in LCA studies and keen on pedagogical research. He teaches subjects related to construction management and Architectural Technology as well as thermal and fluid sciences within various Engineering programmes.

Before coming to Birmingham City University, he worked as a Senior Lecturer in the department of Mechanical and Construction Engineering at Northumbria University. Prior to that, he was a Scientist in the Computational Modelling Section of the Health & Safety Laboratory, a researcher in the Aeronautical Engineering department of Loughborough University and an academic in Bangladesh University of Technology. He has a BSc and MSc in Mechanical Engineering and a PhD in Computational Fluid Dynamics from Imperial College, London. He has published over seventy refereed papers, supervised five PhD’s and more than thirty MSc dissertations.

Read Reaz's full profile