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Manufacturing Engineering with a Foundation Year - BEng (Hons)

  • UCAS Code: H702
  • Level: Foundation
  • Starting: September 2021
  • Study mode: Full Time (4 Years), Sandwich (5 years)
  • Location: City Centre

Studying with us in 2021/22

It is possible that the 2021/22 academic year may be affected by the ongoing disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Any arrangements put in place by the University for the 2021/22 academic year will be in accordance with the latest government public health advice, pandemic-related/health and safety legislation, and the terms and conditions of the student contract.

Manufacturing engineering is an essential feature in the vast arena that is manufacturing – an area that makes large contributions to the wealth of many countries throughout Europe and the rest of the world.

It is a fast-changing scene where the competition between industrial organisations is keen and lean: only those companies prepared to apply modern philosophies and technologies will survive. BEng (Hons) Manufacturing Engineering has been developed to provide you with a good knowledge of a range of manufacturing principles. 

This programme offers an exciting course of study that will prepare you  for the rapidly developing field of manufacturing engineering and its supporting operational systems. Upon your graduation you will have the intellectual, creative and personal qualities necessary for undertaking a leadership role and a depth of knowledge that will enable the application of new and emerging technologies to the solution of manufacturing problems.

About the Foundation Year

The Foundation Year course option enables you to study for our BEng (Hons) degree over an extended full-time duration of four years by including a Foundation Certificate (year one of four). The Foundation Certificate provides a broad study course that underpins the follow-on degree. In order to progress to the next year of your degree, it is necessary to achieve a pass in all of the modules of the Foundation Certificate.

This degree aims to develop engineers who can apply the principles of systems management, engineering and information technology to the solution of operational problems in industry and commerce. Manufacturing engineers are employed in a wide range of engineering, educational and commercial organisations. Graduates from the course are equipped to progress into positions of responsibility in relevant industry, or further programmes of specialised study or research.

There are many challenges facing manufacturing industry. Companies now strive for competitive advantage and have to evaluate their performance more effectively in order to make best possible use of all resources: Talented, innovative, ambitious engineers are needed to give manufacturing organisations a competitive edge

Why Choose Us?

  • State-of-the-art facilities - You will be based at our Millennium Point campus in City Centre, where our facilities have undergone a £6.5 million investment with a new maker area, engineering labs/equipment and IT equipment to provide you with the very best learning experience.
  • Industry sponsored events - Get involved with opportunities to showcase your work at our industry sponsored events such as InnovationFest.
  • Travel scholarships - Opportunities to secure funding to gain experience overseas. Read about our travel scholarships here.
This course is not open to International students

We are members of:

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Entry Requirements

We accept a range of qualifications, the most popular of which are detailed below.

Essential Requirements

BB or 80 UCAS tariff points

A maximum of 3 subjects are considered. These can be other A-levels or level 3 equivalents.

LEVEL 2 QUALIFICATIONS
GCSE
  • GCSE English language and mathematics at grade C/4 or above/li>
  • Equivalent level 2 qualifications can be accepted.
  • Must have been achieved at the point of enrolment
Irish Leaving Certificate (Ordinary Level)
  • See level 3 entry under Irish Leaving Certificate for full details
Scottish Intermediate 2
  • English language and mathematics at grade C or above
  • Must have been achieved at the point of enrolment
Scottish Credit Standard Grade
  • English language and mathematics at grade 2 or above
  • Must have been achieved at the point of enrolment
Scottish National 5
  • English language and mathematics at grade C or above
  • Must have been achieved at the point of enrolment
LEVEL 3 (and above) QUALIFICATIONS
A level and Advanced VCE
  • 80 UCAS points
  • A maximum of 3 subjects are considered. These can be other A-levels or level 3 equivalents.
Access to HE Diploma
  • 60 credits overall. Minimum of 45 credits at level 3. Including 12 technical credits at Merit or Distinction..
  • Pearson BTEC National Extended Diploma
    (2016 – present)
  • Pearson BTEC Extended Diploma (QCF)
    (2010 - 2016)
  • BTEC Level 3 National Diploma
    (2002 – 2010)
  • MMP
  • Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma
    (2016 – present)
  • Pearson BTEC Diploma (QCF)
    (2010 – 2016)
  • BTEC Level 3 National Certificate
    (2002 – 2010)
  • 80 UCAS points
  • Considered with one A-level or an equivalent level 3 qualification
  • Pearson BTEC National Foundation Diploma (2016 to present)

  • Pearson BTEC 90-Credit Diploma (QCF) (2010 - 2016)

  • 80 UCAS points
  • Considered with one A-level or an equivalent level 3 qualification
  • Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate
    (2016 – present)

  • Pearson BTEC Subsidiary Diploma (QCF)
    (2010 - 2016)

  • BTEC Level 3 National Award
    (2002 - 2010)

  • 80 UCAS points
  • Considered with one A-level or an equivalent level 3 qualification

Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate - Skills Challenge Certificate (first teaching September 2015)

  • 80 UCAS points

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma – Core (awarded until 2016) ESW/KS Combined component

  • 80 UCAS points

International Baccalaureate Diploma

  • Obtain a minimum of 28 points overall and pass one of the following subjects from Group 4 at Higher Level (Computer Science, Chemistry, Design Technology, Physics)

  • For students who do not already hold a GCSE in Mathematics at Grade C/4 or above grade 5 in Maths (Standard Level) from the IB Diploma will be accepted

  • For students who do not already hold a GCSE in English Language at Grade C/4 or above Standard Level English Language (not literature) English A - Grade 4 or above or English B - Grade 5 from the IB will be accepted.

Other qualifications
If you have a qualification that is not listed in the table please refer to our full entry requirements on UCAS.

Further guidance on tariff points can be found on the UCAS website.
Additional information for EU/International students
Essential

Please see your country page for further details on the equivalent qualifications we accept.

In additional to the academic entry requirements listed above, international and EU students will also require the qualifications detailed in this table.

EU/Non-EU (International) Qualifications  
IELTS

6.0 overall with 5.5 minimum in all bands

If you do not meet the required IELTS score, you may be eligible for one of our pre-sessional English courses. Please note that you must have a Secure English Language Test (SELT) to study on the pre-sessional English course. More information.

International Baccalaureate Diploma (or equivalent, including internationally accredited Foundation courses).

1. For students who complete the full IB Diploma: a total of 14 points or above from three Higher Level Subjects.

2. Students who do not complete the IB Diploma will be considered on the basis of their IB Certificates.

Students must have grade 5 in Maths (Standard Level)
AND
English Group A - Grade 4 or above,
OR
English Group B and Ab Initio - Grade 5

Country-specific entry requirements and qualifications.

 

International students who cannot meet the direct entry requirements can begin their degree studies at Birmingham City University International College (BCUIC).

Additional Requirements

As part of the application process you will be invited to attend an applicant visit day where you will undertake a short one-to-one interview with an academic member of staff. This is your chance to show us how passionate you are about the subject and it will help us make a decision on your application.

This will provide you with more information about the School and your course. In addition, it will give you a chance to meet and our staff and students to gain a better understanding of what it is like to be a student here.

  • UK students
  • International students

Award: BEng (Hons)

Starting: Sep 2021

  • Mode
  • Duration
  • Fees

Sorry, this course is not available to International students.

If you're unable to use the online form for any reason, you can complete our PDF application form and equal opportunities PDF form instead. The University reserves the right to increase fees in line with inflation based on the Retail Prices Index or to reflect changes in Government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament up to a maximum of five per cent.

Additional costs

There are no compulsory additional costs or charges associated with studying on this course. While you may choose to purchase personal copies of text books, all our key text books are available from our library or online (subject to normal library loan and online access arrangements). If your course includes a residential study session, the accommodation costs for this are already included in your course fee.

Based on the past experience of our students, you might find it helpful to set aside about £50 for each year of your studies for stationery and study materials. All our students are provided with 100 free pages of printing each year to a maximum total value of £15.

Accommodation and living costs

The cost of accommodation and other living costs are not included within your course fees. More information on the cost of accommodation can be found in our accommodation pages.

Part-time applications

Applications for part-time undergraduate courses should be made direct to the faculty.

Application form for part-time undergraduate courses 

Foundation Year

In order to complete this course a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

Mathematics for Engineers 1
20 credits

Mathematics plays a key role in establishing and grounding the professional skills of an engineer. Communicating the ideas of engineering is made both easier and harder by the use of mathematical language.

This module aims to help you become proficient at developing engineering models and arguments, and following them through to their logical conclusions, since application of these arguments has to include their interpretation both to and from the mathematical language.

Engineering Science 1
20 credits

The module aims to provide you with the knowledge and problem solving skills in physical science to enable you to progress to the next module in the science theme, Foundation Science II, and then on to the first year of an engineering degree.

As the practical aspects of physical science are delivered in another theme of the foundation year, the Foundation Science modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects. The subject material will be delivered in two coherent streams, one of which contains predominantly mechanical science and the other predominantly electrical science.

Practical Skills 1
20 credits

This module aims to provide you with the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress to the next module in the practical theme, Practical Skills II, and then on to the first year of an engineering degree.

The theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in another theme of the foundation year. The Practical Skills modules sit alongside these and concentrate on the practical aspects to support your learning.

Mathematics for Engineers 2
20 credits

Mathematics plays a key role in establishing and grounding the professional skills of an engineer. Communicating the ideas of engineering is made both easier and harder by the use of mathematical language.

This module aims to help you become proficient at further developing engineering models and arguments, and following them through to their logical conclusions, since application of these arguments has to include their interpretation both to and from the mathematical language.

Engineering Science 2
20 credits

The module aims to provide you with the knowledge and problem solving skills in physical science to enable you to progress to the first year of an engineering degree. The science theme contains the material normally encountered in an A level physics course which is relevant to entry to an engineering degree. As the practical aspects of physical science are delivered in another theme of the foundation year, the Foundation Science modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects.

Practical Skills 2
20 credits

This module aims to provide the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress to the first year of an engineering degree.

As the theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in another theme of the foundation year, the Practical Skills modules concentrate on the practical aspects.

The subject material will be delivered in three coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical and electrical laboratory exercises, a second PC-based stream will include use of software to support project planning, communication and analysis and the third, a project space where you will have the opportunity to integrate learning from across all elements of the semester. 

Year One

In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

Engineering Principles 1
20 credits

The module aims to provide the underpinning knowledge and problem solving skills in engineering science to enable you to progress to the next module in the theme, Engineering Principles II, and then on to the second year of a range of engineering degrees.

As the practical aspects of engineering science are delivered in another theme of the common first year, the Engineering Principles modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects. The subject material will be delivered in two coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical science and the other contains predominantly electrical science.

Mathematical Modelling 1
20 credits

Mathematics plays a key role in establishing and grounding the skills of an engineer, and the ability to communicate the ideas of engineering that are expected of an engineering graduates.

The primary aim of this module is to provide the fundamental mathematical knowledge and techniques needed in order to enable you to use and apply such mathematical techniques for the evaluation, analysis, modelling and solution of realistic engineering problems. Application of these data sets has to include their interpretation both to and from the mathematical language. In addition, this module will introduce students to mathematical modelling software package. This will be used to plot, annotate basic signals and write simple programs to compute mathematical problems.

This module will develop your ability to both work on and communicate engineering realities to a wider audience, at a professional standard.

Engineering Practice
20 credits

The module aims to provide the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress to the next module in the practical theme, Practical Skills II, and then on to the second year of an engineering degree. As the theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in other themes of the first year, the Practical Skills modules concentrate on the practical aspects.

The subject material will be delivered in three coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical and electrical laboratory exercises, a second PC-based stream will include use of software to support project planning, communication and analysis and the third, a project space where you have the opportunity to integrate learning from across all elements of the semester.

Engineering Principles 2
20 credits

The module aims to provide the underpinning knowledge and problem solving skills in engineering science to enable you to progress to the second year of a wide range of engineering degrees.

As the practical aspects of engineering science are delivered in another theme of the common first year, the Engineering Principles modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects. The subject material will be delivered in two coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical science and the other contains predominantly electrical science. Each stream will be delivered as a 1 hour lecture followed by a 1 hour small group tutorial giving 4 hours contact.

This module will interact with modules in the other two themes in the common first year in that it will rely on knowledge of mathematical techniques developed in the maths/professional skills theme and will provide theoretical underpinning for the experimental activities in the practical theme.

Mathematical Modelling 2
20 credits

This module will focus on introducing and building on well-established techniques for mathematically modelling dynamic systems (systems of interest for engineering) for contextualised engineering applications. The module will include an introduction to sophisticated signal analysis technique, Fourier series which is used to transform time-domain signals into their frequency spectra. The module is structured to include a mixture of lectures, tutorials and PC-based laboratories. The lectures will formally introduce material, in tutorials students will work through questions with tutor. The PC laboratories will involve using mathematical modelling software packages to implement mathematical operations.

Integrated Engineering Project
20 credits

The module aims to provide the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress on to the second year of an engineering degree. As the theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in other themes of the first year, the Practical Skills modules concentrate on the practical aspects.

The subject material will be delivered in three coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical and electrical laboratory exercises, a second PC-based stream will include use of software to support project planning, design, communication and analysis and the third, a project space where you have the opportunity to integrate learning from across all elements of the semester

Year Two

In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

Operations Systems
20 credits

This module provides you with an understanding of the analysis, design and planning of manufacturing and other operating systems, and also an opportunity to investigate and select alternative strategies for the planning, scheduling and control of manufacturing and other operating systems.
The module also covers the quality systems, tools and techniques available to an organisation.

Quality Systems
20 credits

This module aims to provide you with an understanding of the tools and techniques used in quality systems. Topics include Process Improvement, Process Capability, Improvement Techniques, Quality by Design, Mapping Techniques, Quality Costs, TQM and Standards (ISO 9000 etc).

Design and Materials
20 credits

The module provides you with the opportunity to learn about design, sustainable development, teamwork and communication whilst contributing towards real international development projects.

You will also gain the ability to communicate design ideas and practical details, to evaluate and apply both tangible and subjective feedback, and to conceive, design, implement and operate practical solutions to design opportunities.

It is anticipated that the project vehicle for this module will be the Engineers without Borders Design for People Challenge.

Leading Engineering Endeavour
20 credits

An interdisciplinary module, you will work with students from all fields of engineering to develop skills in engineering leadership and experience creating a purposeful vision and delivering on that vision. This will set the professional skills for business in context by combining your technical course-specific knowledge with professional skills. It is proposed that the vehicle to deliver this will be the biomimicry global design challenge.

Design and Manufacture
20 credits

This module develops your research skills, idea generation techniques, and ability to create CAD models and manufactured components.

You will also gain the ability to communicate design ideas and practical details, to evaluate and apply both tangible and subjective feedback, and to conceive, design, implement and operate practical solutions to design opportunities.

Manufacturing Automation and Control
20 credits

This module aims to provide you with an understanding of and practical experience in the techniques used in controlling manufacturing applications. Topics include inspection, machine tool control, flexible and dedicated automation, and work holding systems, supply of power and services and health and safety issues.

Year Three

In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

Advanced Manufacturing
20 credits

If you are intending to work in a manufacturing environment you will need to develop an understanding of the techniques used in Computer Aided Manufacture of components and products. You will also require a working knowledge of the application of CAM and simulation technologies to form complete integrated systems for product manufacture. Topics include CAD, CAM and CNC data forms, simulation of machining operations, manufacturing cells, calibration, measurement and testing, 3-D System simulation; assembly systems; post processor configuration and application; advanced process simulation and product development.

Advanced Materials
20 credits

This module provides an opportunity for you to investigate the world of new materials and their industrial application through a combination of taught content and both practical and theoretical research project work. It is anticipated that guest lectures will provide industrial focus to this wide-ranging subject. It is proposed that a mini-conference will be held at the end of the module, offering opportunities for you to present your findings to academics, your peers, and industrial contacts.

Operations Management
20 credits

The module provides you with an understanding of the factors which control and constrain the performance of manufacturing and other operational systems including topics such as Risk Analysis and Decision Making Process, Material Flow Analysis, Maintenance and Replacement, Development of a Manufacturing Strategy.

Product Lifecycle Management
20 credits

Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) considers products and associated systems from concept to reuse, including design, manufacturing processes and routes, and production management, and places them in a global context which includes sustainability and climate change. This form of systems engineering is focused on meeting all requirements, primarily meeting customer needs, and coordinating the systems design process by involving all relevant disciplines. The core of PLM is in the creation and central management of all product data and the technology used to access this information and knowledge, and this module will help you become proficient in the philosophies, tools and techniques you will need to achieve this coherence. PLM as a discipline emerged from tools such as CAD, CAM and PDM, but can be viewed as the integration of these tools with methods, people and the processes through all stages of a product’s life. It is not just about equipment, material processing and software technology but is also a business strategy. This module has a strong emphasis on the environment and on sustainability of business.

Individual Honours Project
40 credits

The purpose of the module is to enable you to undertake a sustained, in-depth and research-informed project exploring an area that is of personal interest to you. In agreement with your supervisor, you will decide upon your topic which will take the form of a practical outcome (artefact) with accompanying contextual material. The main consideration when choosing your topic is that it must be aligned to the programme you are studying, and you should consider the relevance of this topic to your future academic or professional development.

At this level, you will be expected to work independently but you will receive additional one-to-one support from your supervisor, who will be familiar with your chosen topic area. As you progress on the module, extra support will be available and this may take the form of group seminars, workshops and online materials that will help to develop your project. 

Year Four

In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

Group Integrated Master’s Project
40 credits

The purpose of the module is to enable you to undertake a sustained, in-depth and research-informed group project exploring an area that is of personal interest to you. In agreement with your supervisor, your group will decide upon your topic which will take the form of a practical outcome (artefact) with accompanying contextual material. The main consideration when choosing your group’s topic is that it must be aligned to the programme you are studying, and you should consider the relevance of this topic to your future academic or professional development. 

Advanced Materials and Manufacture
20 credits

This module provides an opportunity for you to investigate the world of new materials and to develop an understanding of the techniques used in Computer Aided Manufacture. This will be set in the context of industrial applications and delivered through a combination of taught content and both practical and theoretical research project work.

Principles of Project Management
20 credits

Project management is the application of processes, methods, knowledge, skills and experience to achieve the project objectives (PMBoK, 6th Ed. (2012). Project management is key to delivering strategic value within an organisation and it involves far more than a time plan, a budget and a risk register. Projects can range from construction of a new building to the launch of new product, or outsourcing previous in-house functions, to the re-engineering of products, services and processes. This module will deal with the two main stages of any project: PLANNING and IMPLEMENTATION.

Seven techniques are identified as being applicable to one or both of these: PRINCE II, Activity networking (Work breakdown schedules), Project Financial Appraisal, Earned Value Method of Project Cost Control, Risk Identification and Assessment, Break-even analysis and Use of Computer Software for project planning and Control. 

Reverse Engineering
20 credits

This module aims to provide you with the tools and techniques you require to assist in developing skills and expertise in the reverse engineering process. The module also provides you with an understanding of, and practical experience in, the techniques used in prototype manufacture.

Resource Management
20 credits

This module will focus on resource management and its effective deployment and allocation to achieve sustainable competitive advantage for organisations. Two main resources will be considered: HUMAN and FINANCIAL; without which, organisational success cannot be guaranteed.

You will be introduced to theoretical concepts underpinning resource development and deployment such as, human capital development, change management, motivational theories, learning organisations, financial methods, investment appraisal, budgeting, alongside financial and management accounting.

How you learn

You will develop analytical skills through coursework tasks, encouraging your creativity and problem solving using relevant systems and technologies.

You will be assessed both formatively and summatively by a number of methods, including coursework exercises, examinations, presentations and practical assignments, while assignment methods will include laboratory and design reports, presentations and in-class demonstrations. Summative assessment is by way of assignments, projects, presentations, time-controlled assignments and end examinations, where appropriate to the individual module.

Attendance requirements

For more information on attendance requirements, course contact time and suggested self-study hours, download the course specification.

Further study

The University has a range of research (PhD) postgraduate programmes. Details can be found on the postgraduate section of the website.

Employment Opportunities

We will prepare you for employment by providing you with the skills, experience and industry links you’ll need to thrive upon graduating.

The University also has its Graduate+ scheme, an extracurricular programme which is designed to augment and enhance the subject-based skills you will develop through the programme. These additional skills and attributes will further enhance your employment options and prospects once you leave the University.

The programme will help you develop your skills in CV writing, presentations, covering letters and creating winning portfolios.

Career paths include opportunities in the following areas:

  • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Project Engineering
  • Process Engineering
  • Process Planning
  • Scheduling and Control
  • Logistics
  • Supply Chain Management
  • Jobs outside of manufacturing and engineering requiring analytical and problem-solving skills

OpportUNIty

OpportUNIty Student Ambassador

OpportUNIty: Student Jobs on Campus ensures that our students are given a first opportunity to fill many part-time temporary positions within the University. This allows you to work while you study with us, fitting the job around your course commitments. By taking part in the scheme, you will gain valuable experiences and employability skills, enhancing your prospects in the job market.

It will also allow you to become more involved in University life by delivering, leading and supporting many aspects of the learning experience, from administration to research and mentoring roles.

Graduate jobs

Students already in employment have often gained promotions in their sponsoring companies and have gone on to pursue professional careers in their chosen industries.

Students who have studied or worked in manufacturing, operations management or general engineering may be eligible to join this course, subject to interview and conditions.

Our Facilities

We offer a wide range of technology to help you with your studies.

We have an ongoing strategy to upgrade and further develop our well-equipped laboratories. These plans are supported by global technology providers such as PTC and Technosoft. These two companies alone have recently donated more than £11 million worth of computer aided design, product lifecycle management and knowledge-based engineering software.

In addition, more than £750,000 worth of capital investment has been made in upgrading our engine emissions test facilities, environmental laboratory and thermodynamics equipment.

Exhaust Analysis

The key features of our exhaust analysis facilities include:

  • Signal Group Analysers in 3 racks with heated sample systems.
  • Sierra BG-3 particulate mini-tunnel.
  • AVL 415S smoke meter.

More about our facilities

Learning from industry experts

Discover more about the industry experts you can meet on our Engineering degree courses.

Laura Leyland is one of our lecturers, watch this video to find out more.

Portrait of  Adnan Fazal

Dr Adnan Fazal

Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering

Dr Adnan Fazal is a Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering and Automotive Engineering. His current research interests include pre-stressed fibre reinforced polymers for improved strength, stiffness, impact protection, resistance to crack propagation and protection against abnormal loads. Potential applications of these smart fibre reinforced polymers include crashworthy structures (automotive), aerofoil morphing structures (aerospace), light-weight blast-resistant (impact protection), medical (dental restoration and prosthetic devices), wind turbine blades and safety and sports apparel.

Read Adnan's full profile

Laura Leyland

Associate Professor and Acting Head Centre of Engineering

Laura Leyland is an Associate Professor and Acting Head of Centre and has been innovating in engineering education for over 10 years, teaching materials based modules and practical project focussed delivery with a specific interest in developing humanitarian engineering. This module delivery incorporates the Engineering for People Challenge from Engineers Without Borders (BCU winners in 2015) and the Global Biomimicry Challenge.
During a university wide curriculum development project, Laura lead the rewrite of all engineering courses for initial delivery in 2018 to the Conceive, Design, Implement, Operate (CDIO) framework which develops professional skills alongside theoretical knowledge.

Dr Dominic Flynn

Dr Dominic Flynn

Lecturer

Dominic Flynn is a Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering and teaches across a range of modules from foundation to MSc level. His teaching interests are in the mechanical sciences as well as fluid and thermodynamics. 

Portrait of Reaz Hasan

Reaz Hasan

Associate Professor

Reaz Hasan’s expertise is primarily in the area of Energy Studies. He has extensive research experience in using CFD for fluid flow and heat transfer in Built Environment and various industrial systems including applications of nano-fluids. He is also involved in LCA studies and keen on pedagogical research. He teaches subjects related to construction management and Architectural Technology as well as thermal and fluid sciences within various Engineering programmes.

Before coming to Birmingham City University, he worked as a Senior Lecturer in the department of Mechanical and Construction Engineering at Northumbria University. Prior to that, he was a Scientist in the Computational Modelling Section of the Health & Safety Laboratory, a researcher in the Aeronautical Engineering department of Loughborough University and an academic in Bangladesh University of Technology. He has a BSc and MSc in Mechanical Engineering and a PhD in Computational Fluid Dynamics from Imperial College, London. He has published over seventy refereed papers, supervised five PhD’s and more than thirty MSc dissertations.

Read Reaz's full profile