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Jiro Amentani

Jiro Amentani- profile-350x263

Can you tell us a little more about your project?

The project was to design for retail stores that sell designed objects to the UK market. The retailer choices on offer all had different styles, approaches to business, consumer base and overall ethos. I conducted research focused particularly through visuals, product analysis, price points, and consumer desires and this pointed me in the direction of the Wallpaper Store, a higher end designer product retailer with a flair for design that fitted with my personal approach to design.

Where did the inspiration for it come from?

I’m constantly inspired by the modern use of materials and colour.  In current contemporary design, black can be seen as one of the most significant colours, therefore, my challenge was to create 'Matt Black' contemporary ceramic products using traditional making methods within in our workshops.

How important is being able to exhibit externally?

It’s a great opportunity for me to show my design work at Minima amongst some famous designer pieces.  This opportunity has driven me on to try to gain deep knowledge of ceramic products and with the support of the ceramic technical staff at uni I’ve moved my making skills on a lot.  I also think it’s good to show what BCU students can create in the workshops to design conscious people in the city.

What has your highlight of the course been so far?

I would say that learning the ceramic process for the making element of this project is my highlight so far. I very much enjoy the process of slip casting, which is sort of a mass production method for ceramics.  Even though there has been many fails along the way, the process has been very rewarding and educational. I’ve learned a lot.  Although at times frustrating, as a whole the ceramic process is amazing to engage with, and there’s a constant element of tension and relaxation.

Could you tell us a little more about your design interests?

I enjoy modern design inspired by nature, California inside-outside design, hand crafted objects, and taking an intelligent approach to how we use materials. I am interested in using raw material found in a lot of ceramics, and very contemporary design work.  I also appreciate an experimental approach to design, so we do not know the final outcome could be.  There’s excitement in that uncertainty.  I feel that the combination of ceramics and my personal design style is a good combination, where I can follow some Japanese aesthetics, and therefore a key cultural exchange in my designs.