Piano-Playing Styles of the Nineteenth Century

Piano-Playing Styles of the Nineteenth Century

Guest Artists

Date and time
04 - 08 Feb 2024 (5:00pm - 9:00pm)
Location

Recital Hall, Royal Birmingham Conservatoire

200 Jennens Road, B4 7XR

Price

£55 Conference Pass

Day Tickets

Sun 4 Feb

Mon 5 Feb 

Tue 6 Feb

Wed 7 Feb

Thu 8 Feb

FREE TICKETS FOR BCU STUDENTS AND STAFF

Use your BCU email address at the checkout to automatically activate your complimentary ticket. Subject to availability. No promo code is needed, unless otherwise communicated. If you have any queries regarding your booking, please contact the Events Team.

Booking Information

Wheelchair users are entitled to concessionary priced tickets with a complimentary companion seat.

Guide dogs are welcome at Royal Birmingham Conservatoire venues. If you wish to bring a guide dog or wheelchair, please let the Events Office know by calling 0121 331 5909.

RBC Piano Department on Bradshaw Hall stage

Experience a nineteenth-century piano artistry through an immersive exploration of the rich tapestry of playing styles from the 1800s.

Delve into the nuances of the era as we meticulously examine the intricacies that defined the music of the era. Our investigation spans Baroque and Classical keyboard playing, reaching into the early 20th century, offering insights into the future of piano styles.

Featuring an impressive array of historical instruments, including Michael Mietke's Double Harpsichord, a 1775 Spinet, John Rawson's Fortepiano from around 1795, Denis Woolley's Fortepiano after Johann Fritz from c.1825, and many others, each carefully selected to enhance appreciation of the repertoire.

Head of Keyboard at Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, John Thwaites said, "We are very excited to offer a a detailed examination of asynchronicity, unwritten arpeggiation, presque plaqué, inégale, tempo flexibility, elastic pulse, agogically inflected hairpins, rubato, the relationship between density of sound and tempo, the relationship between dynamic range and agogic inflection, treatment of dotted rhythm, rhythmic assimilation, rhythmic foreshortening, HIP reassessment of composers' aesthetics, and much else.

"The investigation will include an exploration of both Baroque and Classical keyboard playing and then considers the long reach of the nineteenth century into the early twentieth, as well as what the future for piano styles might be."

To illustrate, we will utilize various instruments, including a newly refurbished copy of Michael Mietke's Double Harpsichord from Schloss Charlottenburg in 1775, a Spinet from the same year; a Fortepiano by John Rawson after Walter (c.1795); a Fortepiano by Denis Woolley after Johann Fritz (c.1825) in Thomas Young temperament; an original Wilhelm Wieck from the 1850s; a Collard and Collard from 1860 with bi-chord stringing throughout, on loan from Apsley House, courtesy of the Museum of Musical Instruments; a Viennese action Streicher from 1862, recently delivered from the Gert Hecher Atelier in Vienna; a Viennese Action Bösendorfer from the 1870s, courtesy of Simon Neal; and an 1880s Erard, 90-note "Paderewski" model (with low G and G sharp), recently delivered from Maison Erard. All instruments are straight-strung. (Steinway D).

Day Schedules 

Sun 4 Feb

Mon 5 Feb 

Tue 6 Feb

Wed 7 Feb

Thu 8 Feb

 

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