Performance Research Hub

Performance is one of the primary activities of the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire. The quality of our performance provision is the cornerstone of the Conservatoire’s international reputation as a world-class centre for education in Music and the Performing Arts. It is natural, therefore, that performance intersects with many aspects of research activity undertaken within the Conservatoire, and that performance is in turn influenced and informed by research.

The Performance Research Hub was formalised in 2017 to foreground our collective expertise across Music, Theatre, Dance and the Performing Arts. We recognise a disciplinary distinction between research about performance, and research in and through performance (Borgdorff, 2012), typified by the twin burgeoning fields of Performance Studies (including Historical Performance Practice) and Artistic Research (Performance-led Research), respectively. Both fields are reflected within the activities of the Hub, which also provides a means of connecting practitioner-researchers with the broader research community.

Additionally, the Hub brings together professional practitioners across Music, Theatre, Cinema, Visual Arts and Design to address research questions in interdisciplinary performing arts, embracing both creative practices and writing about performativity implicit in different disciplines. Understanding the complexities of 21st-century interdisciplinary collaborations, the Hub aims to synergise various fields – digital, spatial, physical – in creating new, experimental artistic expressions and audience experiences.

Performance research has the potential to create insights that are not possible by theoretical means alone. Performance is also a natural conduit for sharing insights generated through research, often with high potential for impact. But one the challenges of practice-led research, and therefore one of the Hub’s key objectives, is to develop and share best practice in the documentation and articulation of the research questions, methods and processes that underpin such activity.

Key Staff

PhD Students and Awards (2014–)

  • Daniel Galbreath
  • Kirsten Igo/Sheldrake
  • Ronny Krippner
  • Samia La Virgne
  • Paul Nevins
  • Tatiana Papageorgiou
  • Joe Scarffe
  • Tadas Stalyga
  • Daniel Tong
  • Joanna Szalewska-Pineau (2016)
  • Sara Hubrich (2014)
  • Claudio Forcada-Delgado (2014)
  • David S. Baltuch (2014)
  • Christos Noulis (2014)