How to stick to your revision timetable

A revision timetable might one of the best ways to organise your revision, but they’re not exactly thrilling. In the ongoing battle between sticking to your revision timetable and beating your friends at Fifa, the revision tends to lose. So we’ve come up with a few tips to make it easier to stick to your timetable and ace those exams.

Don’t have a revision timetable yet? No problem, we’ve got your back.

How to stick to your revision timetable

Make your revision timetable one week at a time

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There is such a thing as too much planning, even when it comes to revision. Getting all your revision down on paper for an entire month can be a great motivator but it leaves no room for life to get in the way (which it inevitably will!). Let’s say you’ve got Tuesday evening booked out for revision but your shift at work changes – you’re not going to be able to do your revision that day. That’s not big deal in itself, but the more revision sessions you miss because of one reason or another, the easier it is to just ignore your revision altogether. It’s better to make your revision timetable week by week so you can plan around your schedule.

This way you can make fewer sacrifices and use your free time as a reward for those hours you spent revising. There are more benefits too! A weekly timetable means you can make changes to what you’re revising week by week, which makes sense because if you’ve been revising a topic for three weeks, you won’t need to do as much revision on that topic in week four.

Top tip Keep a rolling one-week timetable and your revision will be easier to stick to!

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Make time for coursework tasks as well as your revision

This is especially important if you’re also studying BTECs. If you’re having to do coursework alongside your A Levels, don’t treat them as separate things. Work your coursework time into your revision time; so if you’re committed to doing 10 hours of revision a week, take a few of those hours to do coursework. It might sound like you’re not doing enough, but setting realistic goals and sticking to them is better than setting unreasonable goals that can overwhelm you.

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Make rules about your priorities

Nobody is perfect. Even if you follow every single piece of advice in this article you’ll probably still miss a revision session or two - it’s unavoidable. This is why you should mark priorities on your timetable. Find the topics you’re struggling with and whenever you add them to your revision timetable make sure they’re highlighted as important. If you follow this rule you can see at a glance from your timetable the sessions you absolutely can’t miss.

Mix up your revision styles

Mix up revision

No one loves revision, and even if you do a lack of variation can make things boring really quickly. If you can’t focus on your revision because you’re incredibly bored it can really hurt your motivation. So mixing up how you revise can help you stick to your timetable.

Here’s some top tips:
  • Don’t put long revision sessions next to each other. Try separating them with quicker revision techniques like flashcards or practice papers.
  • Change the format. You don’t always need to use a pen and paper. Watch a YouTube video on your topic or find practical revision websites like S-cool to give you a break from pages of text (just make sure the resources match your topic).
  • Use different techniques. Try post-it notes, posters, spreadsheets and whatever else you can find! On your revision timetable, make a little note about how you’re going to study during that session to give you some direction before you start.

Those are just a few tips to help you master your revision timetable. Timetables not your thing? What about Bullet Journals? We’ve got a guide for that too!

Worried? Don't be!

Worried? Don't be.

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