Psychology with Criminology - BSc (Hons)

UCAS Code:
N/A
Attendance:
Full Time (3 Years), Sandwich (4 Years), Part Time (5 Years)
Starting:
September 2019
Campus:

Want to study both psychology and criminology at University? Our BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology degree combines both subjects and allows you to take a year-long industry placement.

Our innovative criminology and psychology course will give you a deep understanding of how the core and specialised areas in psychology and criminology contribute to our understanding of contemporary issues.

You will apply scientific reasoning and evaluate patterns of behaviour, gaining key transferable skills in communication, teamwork and problem-solving. Additionally, you will also learn how psychology can be applied to explain certain aspects of crime and criminal behaviour.

What's covered in the course?

This versatile course provides the opportunity for you to embark on a psychology career, or bring those skills to the domain of criminology.

Over the three years, your Psychology modules will help you gain a deep understanding of one’s mind, behaviour and reasons why individuals carry out certain actions, while your Criminology modules will help you understand the relationship between the different aspects of crime and victimisation.

Our focus on contemporary and innovative learning practices will help you gain key employability skills, such as communication, teamwork and problem-solving, as well as key skills in two innovative, intriguing disciplines.

Why Choose Us?

  • Students are satisfied with our Psychology courses! We scored 93.2 per cent for overall satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2017.
  • This degree course is accredited by the British Psychological Society. This means that on successfully completing your degree with a pass of over 50%, you will gain Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society. This allows you to pursue a career path in Psychology through accredited Master’s and Doctoral programmes throughout the UK. The course is therefore as professionally relevant and up-to-date as possible, taking into account the very latest developments in the profession.
  • On all of our programmes you will gain a professional focus and real world experience of psychology, ensuring you are equipped to make an immediate impact in your career. You have the opportunity to embark on a year-long sandwich placement as part of your degree course.
  • All of our programmes have an international focus. This is embedded throughout the curriculum, giving you the opportunity to transform your experience with us into a global one. There are a variety of exciting possibilities open to you, ranging from our successful international travel scholarships scheme, through which you can spend a summer working for a charitable organisation overseas, to one of our many overseas study exchange programmes.
  • As a student on one of our undergraduate degrees, you will be able to benefit from our Graduate+ initiative. This three-year award programme enables you to gain award levels for all the extra-curricular activities you undertake so that you can stand out from the crowd on graduation.
  • You’ll have the opportunity to work in collaboration with our academic researchers to gain specialist insight into the fields of clinical, forensic, health and occupational psychology.
  • You can get involved with additional Psychology projects via our Voluntary Research Assistantship and Student Research Scheme.
  • All of our assessments emphasise the practical elements of the course, giving you a taste of what it is actually like to be a psychologist.
  • You will study in our state-of-the-art City Centre Campus, ideally located for you to take advantage of our links to industry in the UK’s second city.
  • We have the latest in psychological testing equipment, including eye tracking and EEG scanners.
  • Student support is at the forefront of our approach, with everything designed to give you the skills you need to succeed in the profession.

To welcome all new home and EU undergraduate degree students starting in 2018 or 2019, we're giving at least £150 worth of credit to spend in a host of ways, on books and a range of learning materials. Even better, it doesn’t have to be repaid. Terms and conditions apply.

Find out more

This course is open to International students

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*DLHE 2016/17

Course Accreditations

This course is accredited by:

The British Psychological Society

Entry Requirements

We accept a range of qualifications, the most popular of which are detailed below.

UK students
Essential

BBC or 112 UCAS tariff points from A/AS Level with a minimum of 2 A Levels.

GCSE English Language and Maths at grade 4 or above. Must have been achieved at the point of enrolment. Equivalent qualifications will be considered.

Typical Offers
UK Qualification Requirements 2019/20
A Level / AS Level BBC at A Level (112 points). Most subjects accepted including Citizenship Studies and Critical Thinking, excluding General Studies.
Access to Higher Education Diploma 60 credits overall including 45 at level 3 of which 18 Level 3 credits are at merit or distinction grade. Must be on a Social Sciences / Humanities pathway with a minimum of one 6-credit module in Psychology. Must also hold GCSE English Language and Maths at grade 4+ or equivalent.
BTEC National Diploma (12-units not including early years) / Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma D*D*. Most subjects accepted including Health and Social Care, excluding Early Years, Early Years & Children's Play, Learning & Development and Health and Social Care pre 2016.
BTEC Extended Diploma (18-units not including early years) / Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma DMM (112 points). Most subjects accepted including Health and Social Care, excluding Early Years, Early Years & Children's Play, Learning & Development and Health and Social Care pre 2016.
BTEC Subsidiary Diploma / Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate Combined with other level 3 qualifications to achieve a minimum total of 112 UCAS points.
International Baccalaureate Diploma

Obtain a minimum of 28 points overall. Students who do not complete the IB Diploma will be considered on the basis of their IB Certificates and alongside other acceptable level 3 qualifications to meet 112 UCAS Tariff Points.

If taking the IB Certificate you will need to obtain a total of 14 points or above from three Higher Level Subjects.

Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level) Pass the Irish Leaving Certificate with a minimum of 112 tariff points, achieved in four Higher level subjects.  This must include Maths and English Language taken at either Ordinary level (minimum grade O1-O4 (or A-C/A1-C3)) or Higher level (minimum grade H5/D1).
Scottish Advanced Higher

Achieve a minimum of 112 tariff points achieved in either three Advanced Highers or from a combination of two Advanced Highers plus two Highers. Where three Advanced Highers have been taken achieve a minimum of grades CCD. 

Where a combination of Highers and Advanced Highers have been taken you must achieve (grades of CD in two Advanced Highers plus grades of CC in two Highers).

Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate Skills Challenge Certificate Considered in combination with either two A-levels (grades B and B), two 6-unit BTEC Subsidiary Diplomas / OCR Cambridge Technical Introductory Diplomas  (grades D and M) or a BTEC 12-unit National Diploma/ OCR OCR Cambridge Technical Diploma (grades DM).
Other qualifications
If you have a qualification that is not listed in the table please refer to our full entry requirements on UCAS.

Further guidance on tariff points can be found on the UCAS website.
EU / International students
English language requirements 2017/18
IELTS 6.0 overall with 5.5 minimum in all bands
Other accepted qualifications Visit our English language page
International Students

Entry requirements here

From A/AS Level with a minimum of 2 A Levels

UK or EU students

Award Start Mode Duration Fees
BSc (Hons) Sep 2019 FT 3 Years £9,250 per year Apply via UCAS
SW 4 Years
TBC
Apply via UCAS
PT 5 Years
TBC

International Students

Award Start Mode Duration Fees
BSc (Hons) Sep 2019 FT 3 Years £12,300 per year
SW 4 Years
TBC
Register your interest

If you're unable to use the online form for any reason, you can complete our PDF application form and equal opportunities PDF form instead. Fees for 2019/20 will be published as soon as possible. The University reserves the right to increase fees in line with inflation based on the Retail Prices Index or to reflect changes in Government funding policies or changes agreed by Parliament up to a maximum of five per cent.

Guidance for UK/EU students

UCAS

UK and EU students applying for most undergraduate degree courses in the UK will need to apply through UCAS.

The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) is a UK organisation responsible for managing applications to university and college.

Applying through UCAS
 Register with UCAS
 Login to UCAS
 Complete your details
 Select your course
 Write a personal statement
 Get a reference
 Pay your application fee
 Send UCAS your application

Non-EU (International) students

There are three ways to apply:

1) Direct to the University

You will need to complete our International Application Form and Equal Opportunities Form, and submit them together with scan copies of your original academic transcripts and certificates.

2) Through a country representative

Our in-country representatives can help you make your application and apply for a visa. They can also offer advice on travel, living in the UK and studying abroad.

3) Through UCAS

If you are applying for an undergraduate degree or a Higher National Diploma (HND), you can apply through the UK’s Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS).

You can request a printed form from your school or nearest British Council office. You will be charged for applying through UCAS. Birmingham City University’s UCAS code is B25 BCITY.

Personal statement

UK / EU students are required to submit a personal statement as part of their application for this course.*

The personal statement gives you a crucial opportunity to say why you’re applying and why the institution should accept you.

Here are the key areas you’ll need to address:

Course choice

Why does this course appeal? What areas are of particular interest?

Career plans

If you have a specific career in mind, say how your chosen course will help you pursue this goal.

Work experience

Mention any work that is relevant to your subject, highlighting the skills and experience gained.

School or college experience

Highlight skills gained at school/college, eg summer schools or mentoring activities.

Non-accredited skills or achievement

eg Duke of Edinburgh Award, Young Enterprise scheme.

You should also mention your future plans – if you’re planning to take a year out, don't forget to give your reasons. Talk about any subjects you’re studying that don’t have a formal assessment and any sponsorships or placements you’ve applied for. And don't be scared to add in details about your social, sports or leisure interests.

Get more information on writing personal statements.

*Non-EU students are not required to submit a personal statement when applying for this course.

Fees for part time students

If you study this course part-time or via distance learning, you will be charged on a pro-rata basis. This means your fee will be calculated per module.

Additional costs

There are no compulsory additional costs or charges associated with studying on this course. While you may choose to purchase personal copies of text books, all our key text books are available from our library or online (subject to normal library loan and online access arrangements).

Based on the past experience of our students, you might find it helpful to set aside about £50 for each year of your studies for your personal stationery and study materials. All our students are provided with 100 free pages of printing each year to a maximum total value of £15.

Accommodation and living costs

The cost of accommodation and other living costs are not included within your course fees. More information on the cost of accommodation can be found in our accommodation pages.

The additional costs listed here are to be used for indicative purposes only and are based on the additional costs for the 2018/19 academic year. The additional costs for 2019/20 will be published as soon as possible.

Worried about personal statements?

Worried about personal statements?

If you've got no idea where to start or just want to check you're on the right track, we’ve got expert advice and real examples from our students to help you nail your personal statement. You can even download our ultimate personal statement guide for free.

Get personal statement advice

Loans and Grants

Financial Support

We offer further information on possible undergraduate financial support. This includes the type of loans, grants and scholarships available both from the government and from Birmingham City University.

Year One

In order to complete this course, you must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 100 credits):

Introduction to Psychology
20 credits

This module explores the origins, developments and refinements in the study of modern-day Psychology, dating back to early philosophy. The module will ensure students will see how modern-day Psychology has evolved, not just in terms of the “big-names” but also by viewing the scientific, cultural and social movements and influences that were happening alongside the development of this new discipline.

Download the full module specification

Psychology and Research Skills
20 credits

This module explores many of the key skills and competencies required for a successful transition to university and beyond. The module will introduce students to members of staff in the department as active researchers. The lectures will describe research skills and discuss how these have been used in real world research. The module will also explore many of the methods involved in planning and executing research within Psychology, such as identifying an appropriate research question, reviewing existing literature, research planning, data collection methods and ethical considerations.

Download the full module specification

On Crimes and Punishment – An Introduction to Criminological Theory
20 credits

This module explores and examines the origins of criminology, some of its historical debates, concepts, literature and research. It will outline what are often considered the core perspectives and theories related to crime and criminality. It introduces students to the history and development of criminology as an academic discipline.

Download the full module specification

Introduction to Research Methods and Statistics
20 credits

This module introduces you to the process of conducting research, analysing data and evaluating the findings. The module will provide a conceptual understanding of reporting research, the core statistical principals and tests used. The module provides hands-on experience of conducting an experiment, using statistical software for carrying out analyses and writing up the experiment in practical workshops. This module will equip you with the necessary knowledge and skills required to prepare you for future work, training or careers in an applied area of Psychology or research. This module will also identify how the skills and knowledge gained during this module are relevant to future modules that cover GBC competencies and training which are relevant to future work and studies in the area of Psychology.

Download the full module specification

The Social Construction of Crime and Deviance
20 credits

This module will examine the ways in which criminological and sociological theorising help us to challenge common sense in order to widen our understanding of a) ‘deviant’ identities and b) the operation of social control. This module will explore the ways in which crime and deviance are socially constructed through varying contexts and how differing ‘deviant’ identities and subcultures are socially controlled and represented. Furthermore, the module explores the relations of power through which ‘deviant’ labels are ascribed (focusing on social stratifications such as gender, class, race/ethnicity, sexuality and age in order to reveal the fluidity of so-called ‘deviant’ identities).

Download the full module specification

In order to complete this course, you must successfully complete at least 20 credits from the following list of OPTIONAL modules:

Cyberpsychology
20 credits

The increasing use and accessibility of technology and the internet in our daily lives has led to the development of the area of Cyberpsychology, an area that focusses on the exploration of how we use technology, how we behave online, and how technology in turn shapes our behaviour. This applied area relates to real world issues such as cyberbullying, robotics, online health support, online deception, social media use, trolling, relationships and online research ethics. This module is well placed to allow you to apply psychological theory to contemporary real world phenomena.

Download the full module specification

Parapsychology
20 credits

The parapsychology module focuses on exploring how Psychology is placed in the wider domain of “science” and through debates about the meaning and function of parapsychological belief, parapsychological research, and the social/historical relevance of parapsychology. Throughout the module you will be presented with a number of parapsychological topics (e.g., Alien abduction; Telepathy; Clairvoyance; Demonic possession) which will be underpinned by two broad perspectives: (i) believer and (ii) sceptic. You will be introduced to the methodological, theoretical and psychological problems in examining paranormal belief and experience in order to provide opportunities for the development of semantic learning and critical thinking skills.

Download the full module specification

Introduction to Psychopathology
20 credits

Introduction to Psychopathology, will introduce you to psychological disorders such as depression, schizophrenia, addiction etc. and how these psychological disorders have an effect on daily thinking, functioning and behaviour. The assessment and diagnosis process of a psychological disorder will play a central role in this module and this will be done by using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5; 2013). The DSM-5 (2013) is used by clinicians worldwide to assess and diagnose individuals with a psychological disorder. In this module the DSM-5 (2013) will be used to describe the key symptoms of psychological disorders which will help to enhance your understanding of key symptoms and criteria used by clinicians to diagnose a psychological disorder.

Download the full module specification

 
Please note list of optional modules is indicative only. Students’ choice will not be guaranteed for optional modules but a fair and transparent process will be adopted and shared with students.

Year Two

In order to complete this course, you must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 80 credits):

Qualitative Research Methods and Analyses
20 credits

This module provides you with an overview of the purpose, design, and conduct of qualitative research in psychology. This module builds upon and complements research methods modules delivered in level 4 by providing students with grounding in the use of qualitative research methods and analysis techniques commonly used in psychology. All sessions are structured to facilitate both conceptual learning and the development of applied research skills. More specifically, this module aims to help you develop skills in research and inquiry and develop academic attributes such as being able to think critically about different methodologies and knowledge claims.

Download the full module specification

Forensic Psychology
20 credits

This optional Level 5 module is designed to introduce you to the field of forensic psychology. Forensic psychology is one of the key psychological domains recognised by the British Psychological Society and covers a broad range of topics highly relevant to the real world context. A key aim of the module is to teach you about a range of criminal justice settings within which psychology can be applied to assist the work of practitioners and the police.

Download the full module specification

Neuropsychology
20 credits

This module will continue to develop key transferable skills from level 4 such as group discussion and debate, critical evaluation and evidence-based reasoning. There will be research-led teaching which will explore key debates and methodologies used in neuropsychology and cognitive Psychology. The GBC area of biological Psychology and cognitive Psychology will be supplemented through this module.

Download the full module specification

Quantitative Research Methods and Statistics
20 credits

This module builds on the Research Methods and Psychology literacy module (Level 4), by providing you with the skills to master the process of designing and executing research using quantitative research methods, and analysing and evaluating the findings with quantitative data analysis techniques. The module provides hands-on experience of using computer software to build experiments and statistical software for carrying out analyses in the practical workshops. The module will enhance your skills in critically evaluating the strengths and limitations of published research papers and equip you with an advanced understanding of ethics in psychological research.

Download the full module specification

In order to complete this course, you must successfully complete at least 40 credits from the following list of OPTIONAL modules:

Prisons and Punishment
20 credits

This module is designed to develop learners’ understanding of the emergence and development of key theories of punishment through an exploration of the history of penal theory and its contemporary challenges and controversies. Furthermore, this module seeks to refine and expand upon traditional theoretical perspectives of punishment and the current reliance upon imprisonment as a dominant form of punishment in England and Wales. In doing so, it requires students to critically engage with some of the limitations of such an approach.

Download the full module specification

Youth Crime and Justice
20 credits

Youth Crime and Justice aims to equip students with a sound theoretical knowledge of juvenile offending and justice. In essence, the understanding of the complex relationship between young people and criminality fits within the wider aims of the degree programme and associated pathways as it draws on sociological, psychological and criminological understandings, furthering students’ ability to understand and problematize crime and its causes. The module also recognises that the separate and distinct administration to criminal justice to young people is a topic worthy of consideration in its own right, and considers important debates around justice, welfare, education and the construction of youth and childhood. It takes both a contemporary and historical focus, considering how the nexus of crime, control and youth have variously been considered during different historical periods.

Download the full module specification

Health Psychology
20 credits

This module aims to introduce you to the area of health psychology and demonstrate how psychological principles may be applied to understand and alleviate problems of illness, ill health and health-related behaviours which are significant real world problems (pursing excellence). Key models and theories that aim to predict risk behaviour and at promoting health and self-care will be discussed, compared and contrasted. Interventions to promote behaviour change will also be covered. Behaviour change techniques and adherence will be debated with practical examples given. After considering the role of psychology in the field of health the module will focus on factors such as stress and its effects on health and illness. Coping styles and strategies as well as social support will be discussed as moderators of the relation between stress and illness.

Download the full module specification

Occupational Health Psychology
20 credits

Occupational Health Psychology (OHP) will cover the importance of how the workplace can impact upon people’s health (in both negative and positive ways) and how the workplace can also be used to improve well-being. The definition of OHP is ‘application of psychology to improving the quality of work life and to protecting and promoting the safety, health and well-being of workers’ (The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; NIOSH).

Download the full module specification

Educational Psychology
20 credits

This module aims to equip you with the relevant skills and knowledge, which are required for the role of the educational psychologist. The module will provide you with an understanding of the general principles and concepts underlying the British educational system and the relevance of psychology to that system. This module examines the role of the educational psychologist and explores the relationship between theory and practice within different educational contexts. The module will familiarise you with different methods of investigation (psychometric testing, observational techniques, interviewing and projective techniques) and intervention methods (behaviour modification, task analysis, conflict mediation and counselling). The module will also help you appreciate the integration and inter-relationships of different perspectives in psychology which contribute to this specialised applied area in psychology which transcend into applied and specialised areas of work within the Educational sector.

Download the full module specification

Real World Work Experiences
20 credits

At this level of study you will be encouraged to think about areas of study or work that you would like to pursue upon completion of this course. You will be firstly introduced to the different areas of psychology that you can specialise in. This will involve looking at the roles that psychologists perform within each of the branch areas as well as what is entailed to become specialised and charted within each particular branch. Workshops will be carried out within the following which will be supported by psychologists both within and external to the university.

Download the full module specification

 
Please note list of optional modules is indicative only. Students’ choice will not be guaranteed for optional modules but a fair and transparent process will be adopted and shared with students.

Final Year

In order to complete this course, you must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 80 credits):

Integrative Psychology Project
40 credits

Understanding research issues is an essential skill for psychologists operating in an evidence-based paradigm. The ability to produce an in-depth dissertation and present a logical argument using such research is a crucial skill for a successful psychology graduate.

This module builds upon learning at level 4 and level 5 in previous Psychological Research Methods modules. This module will encourage you to plan, execute and write up a research project which adheres to principles of the Psychology Ethics Committee. You should seek out research sources to produce an in-depth dissertation that answers your own identified research question or knowledge gap, making a contribution to the existing literature within your chosen topic area. This will be facilitated through critical evaluation of the sources you have selected and used. You will also be facilitated in using statistical and other specialist software, testing equipment and materials, as well as the use of the Psychology laboratories.

Download the full module specification

Applied Social Psychology
20 credits

The applied social psychology module focuses on exploring how social psychological theory and research can be applied to real life. Throughout the module you will be presented with a number of contemporary social issues and will explore relevant theoretical models and examples to illustrate the impact that social psychological constructs, theories and research has had on informing applied interventions. Theoretical perspectives might include cross cultural psychology, individual differences, and critical social psychology. Contemporary social issues might include encouraging cooperation with authorities, understanding responses to terrorism, reducing prejudice, and promoting employee production.

Download the full module specification

Lifespan Psychology
20 credits

This module aims to investigate human development throughout the lifespan focusing on changes to biological, cognitive, social and emotional elements of psychological functioning. The module will provide you with an understanding of the general principles and concepts, different theoretical perspectives, research methodologies, contemporary debates and areas of application of Lifespan Development. This module will enable you to develop skills in critical reading and analysis of theoretical and empirical issues related to Lifespan Development. In the context of contemporary societies and globalisation, the role of social and cultural context of development is explored.

Download the full module specification

In order to complete this course, you must successfully complete at least 40 credits from the following list of OPTIONAL modules:

Human Rights: Theory and Practice
20 credits

This module provides students with an opportunity to critically explore the concepts, debates, literature and research relating to rights. It encourages students to develop an informed and systematic approach to thinking about rights and to develop their knowledge of the main theories of rights. Given the centrality of rights to liberal democracy, the module assists students to better grasp the ideological context within which criminological thinking takes place.

Download the full module specification

Homicide and Multiple Homicide: Criminological Understandings of Killing
20 credits

This single module provides students with an opportunity to critically engage with some of the key aims of their programme by examining some of the contemporary debates that surround the phenomenon of homicide and multiple homicide- and how various perspectives have generated their own arguments in an attempt to understand this unique form of offending. In doing so, students will be given various case studies of serial murderers, focusing on more historical cases before moving to more contemporary examples, whilst also providing how academic understanding and society has developed during this time. By presenting both a theoretical discussion and real life cases of serial murder, students will be provided an opportunity to develop knowledge and critical understanding of criminology and related disciplines both in theory and in practice.

Download the full module specification

Cyber Crime
20 credits

The module will introduce students to the complex world of cyber-crime and issues related to cyber technology and how the police deal with cyber issues from cyber terrorism, cyber bullying and cyber hate. The module will work well alongside the other modules related to security studies where students will examine the rationale of cyber-crimes.

Download the full module specification

Gender and Crime
20 credits

This module will explore the gendered nature of crime and criminal justice. In doing so, we will consider the gendered perspective of victims, perpetrators and those working within the Criminal Justice System. This module will draw on a broad theoretical framework; including feminist, psychological, biological and human rights perspectives. This module is central to the students’ development of critical appreciation of the relationship between the individual and social aspects of crime and victimisation.

Download the full module specification

 
Please note list of optional modules is indicative only. Students’ choice will not be guaranteed for optional modules but a fair and transparent process will be adopted and shared with students.

Course Structure

Examples of formative activities include essays, research proposals, semi-formal debates, individual group presentations, multiple choice questionnaires, quizzes, online forums and mock exams. We also offer scheduled one-to-one meetings and office hours for more detailed feedback if required. The formative activities will help you complete your summative assessments with a clear focus and confidently.

You will look at how the core specialised areas of psychology and criminology will contribute to the understanding of important contemporary issues, as well as looking at how the two disciplines can explain the interaction of humans in the social world.

Practice-based and enquiry-led in nature, our course will expose you to a range of learning activities that offer you opportunities to apply scientific theory and research to contemporary phenomena. This will not only enable you to understand how people respond in varying situations, but will also encourage you to challenge misconceptions about human behaviour and society.

During your criminology modules you will question how criminology explores and questions why people commit crimes, how the society we live in perceives and treats criminals and victims of crime, and the people in charge of the criminal justice system in a global context.

Trips and Visits

Previous trips have included visiting the Science Museum in London, getting to see some of the museum’s acclaimed science exhibitions, and learning first-hand key processes and information.

This course is accredited by:

The British Psychological Society
The British Psychological Society

This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society, which not only demonstrates the high quality of our teaching provision, but also ensures our course remains cutting-edge, fresh and relevant.

The Society and its members develop, promote and apply psychology for the public good. They enhance the efficiency and usefulness of psychologists by setting high standards of professional education and knowledge, and cover all areas of psychological research and practice.

Find out more about British Psychological Society accreditation.

International Opportunities

You can gain international insight and experience a new culture with our Erasmus exchange programme. Students have spent a term at a number of incredible institutions, including the University of San Diego in the USA, as well as destinations in Cyprus and Denmark.

We also offer our Make a Difference scheme, which has seen former students go to Thailand and Morocco.

Further Study

Upon graduating from this course, you could progress onto one of our postgraduate courses.

Our MSc Forensic Psychology will enable you to develop a career in forensic or forensic-related settings, working with offenders and victims of crime.

We also offer an MSc Psychology course designed for non-accredited psychology graduates or graduates with a degree in an unrelated area looking to develop a career in professional psychology.

Enhancing employability skills

To complement these attributes will be a host of transferrable skills, which employers from many contrasting industries frequently look for.

You’ll benefit from visiting professors from various applied psychology settings such as healthcare, clinical psychology, police and specialist academics in other universities.

You will also, through our Careers and Job Prospects team, be offered the chance to develop and improve your employability through workshops on CVs, career planning and interviews.

OpportUNIty

OpportUNIty Student Ambassador

OpportUNIty: Student Jobs on Campus ensures that our students are given a first opportunity to fill many part-time temporary positions within the University. This allows you to work while you study with us, fitting the job around your course commitments. By taking part in the scheme, you will gain valuable experiences and employability skills, enhancing your prospects in the job market.

It will also allow you to become more involved in University life by delivering, leading and supporting many aspects of the learning experience, from administration to research and mentoring roles.

Firewalking

BCU Graduate+

Through our courses we give you the skills and experience needed to get a head start when applying for jobs. But we offer something extra too – Graduate+.

Our unique programme gives you the chance to develop valuable skills outside of the more formal classroom learning. We award points for Graduate+ activities (including firewalking!) and these can be put towards a final Graduate+ award.

More about Graduate+

Graduate Jobs

Our graduates progress into a number of roles, working for companies and charities such as NSPLC Childline, The Island College and West Midlands Ambulance Service, working as specialist tutors, counsellors and house advisors.

*DLHE 2016/17

Birmingham City University is a vibrant and multicultural university in the heart of a modern and diverse city. We welcome many international students every year – there are currently students from more than 80 countries among our student community.

The University is conveniently placed, with Birmingham International Airport nearby and first-rate transport connections to London and the rest of the UK.

Our international pages contain a wealth of information for international students who are considering applying to study here, including:

The UK remains one of the world's leading study destinations

The UK remains one of the world's leading study destinations for international students.

The first-class experience offered by universities are reflected in the world’s largest survey of international students. International students are more likely to recommend the UK than any other leading English-language study destination.

Birmingham City University International College (BCUIC)

International students who have a serious interest in studying with us but who perhaps cannot meet the direct entry requirements, academic or English, or who have been out of education for some time, can enter Birmingham City University International College (BCUIC) and begin their degree studies.

BCUIC

BCUIC is part of the global Navitas Group, an internationally recognised education provider, and the partnership allows students to access the University’s facilities and services and move seamlessly through to achieving a Bachelor’s degree from Birmingham City University.

Learn more about BCUIC

Popular home countries

Our students come from around the world but our psychology with criminology course is most popular with international students from:

Russia Flag

Russia

Curzon facilities eatery
Curzon facilities staircase
Curzon facilities student hub

Our Facilities

We are constantly investing in our estate and are currently in the process of spending £260 million on new learning facilities.

The Curzon Building

This course is based at our City Centre Campus – and specifically The Curzon Building, alongside other social sciences, law, business and English students.

The £63m building offers students a unique social learning space, including a dedicated student hub incorporating student support services, in the heart of Birmingham’s Eastside development.

Realistic, simulated environments include two mock court rooms, a Magistrates' and Crown Court, and an interviewing suite. We’re also exploring the use of virtual environments as a way to develop case study analysis.

For those studying on the BA (Hons) Policing or BA (Hons) Criminology, Policing and Investigation degrees, you’ll experience simulations of police interviewing environments for both suspects and witnesses, with access to tape recording and video playback analysis.

Crime investigation files are prepared using computer-based technology, and the crime data analysis requirements of the degree are supported by appropriate statistical and analytical software.

Psychology students can look forward to using state-of-the-art equipment as well, including the latest in eye-tracking software, and our new EEG machine, all geared towards giving you true hands-on experience with tools you’ll be using in your later career. You will also benefit from facilities across the wider campus including the Parkside and Millennium Point buildings.

The Curzon Building also features:

  • An impressive new library with access to over 65 million full text items and stunning views of Eastside City Park
  • Your Students’ Union which is located in a beautifully restored 19th century pub, The Eagle and Ball
  • A modern 300-seat food court with space to study and socialise
  • Brand new, accessible IT facilities with full Office365 for all students for free

David Wilson

Professor David Wilson

Emeritus Professor

David Wilson is a former prison governor and expert on serial killers through his work with various British police forces, academic publications, books, and media appearances. Most recently he appeared on the Channel 5 documentary, Serial Killers.

Imran Awan profile picture

Professor Imran Awan

Professor and Deputy Director of the Centre for Applied Criminology

Imran's areas of expertise are based around the impact of Islamophobia and the effects of counter-terrorism. As well as being a regular face in the media, Imran is a government advisor for the Cross-Government Working Group on Anti-Muslim Hatred.

Dr Elle Boag

Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology, Teaching, Learning and Quality Lead

After completing her BSc in psychology in 2006 at the University of Southampton, Elle Boag was awarded both the school of psychology prize and the BPS prize for best dissertation in the Wessex region. Subsequently, she continued onto an MSc in research methods in psychology which she completed in 2007.